Monday, September 8, 2014

My thoughts on the AQS Grand Rapids show Part III and my version of Krista's beautiful and fun new pattern

All the Colours

The working name for this quilt is All the Colours. It is my version of Krista (Poppyprint)'s excellent new pattern Chess on the Steps - you can go here to see her quilt, it is worth it, I'll wait. Currently Krista's pattern which uses her fast and fun improv technique is the September Quilt of the Month which is a monthly pattern series that comes to Modern Quilt Guild members. Well worth the membership fee for these patterns alone.

That piece in the photo above is about 25" square so I have added some coloured borders to make her about 46" square so she can be a nice baby quilt. I just finished quilting her tonight and will be deciding on a border next. I'll show you more about her soon.

I want to finish my series of posts about attending the American Quilter's Society Grand Rapids show in August. You can see my posts showing off many of the beautiful modern quilts here and here.

I had a great time going to this show. I was able to take two long arm quilting classes, in which I learned many things about being a better long arm quilter. I had plenty of time to carefully look at the exhibits and the show of quilts. I visited all the vendors two or three times. I had very sore feet all the time. People were friendly and the food was also great. But. You know there is a but, right?

But, I now understand why the Modern Quilt Guild exists much more than I did before. Despite all the talent, quilts, and nice people, there was very little at this huge quilt show for me. I scoured the vendors and bought only two small packs of hand dyed fabrics in alternative substrates. There were only maybe a couple of vendors with more modern fabrics, but I had the prints they had on hand. And I did spend a lot of money on the best, fanciest cutting table ever, which will arrive at my house in another month or so and then I can show you why I am so excited about it. Oh, and I met the nicest women selling environmentally friendly jewelry cleaner which I also bought.

But mostly the vendors, and the show, were full of tea dyed, muted colours  in fabrics and quilts. It felt very heavy to me, oppressively so. When I saw a quilt with bright white or even just bright colours in it, or a lot of negative space, I could feel the weight lift. Now I finally understand better why so many modern quilts have loads of white negative space, or even coloured negative space.

One last thing I wanted to share, and I have thought a lot about how I share this. It seems to me that a lot of these folks don't get the modern quilters at all.

For example, in my long arm classes, modern quilts were referred to as "simple" and "simplistic" and not as a compliment on their minimalism. There was a clear view that modern quilts were ill constructed and likely to have their pressed open seams split. It was clearly stated in one class - a class aimed at teaching modern quilting motifs - that modern quilts were so simple that it was necessary for them to be "quilted to death" to make them eligible for prizes at quilt shows. It was also said that such simple quilts could not deserve prizes otherwise, as they could be pieced in such little time.

Worse, it was suggested that to quilt modern quilts, one should divide up the quilt into random segments and use different quilting motifs for each. When asked (by me), that instructor said there was no need to give any consideration to what the piecer was trying to achieve when dividing up the quilt as the piecer likely did not know what she wanted for the quilting. The piecer was looking to the quilter to just "do her best" to make the modern quilt into something special. I was shocked and I have to admit that I did not quarrel with that instructor, I just did not ask any more questions. I needed time to think.

I took this as just a few people's opinions and I still learned many things. But I felt like a spy. I thought a lot. I now take away from this experience that modern quilters need to get out and share what we do more with these traditional quilters. Those quilters and their teachers don't read blogs, and surely don't instagram or twitter - at least not with the vast online community that I share with.

So, in my view, we need to show them more of what we do, by entering contests, attending the shows, asking questions, teaching classes, etc. Otherwise these ill informed opinions are all that students and visitors to these kinds of shows will see.

I don't think we change things by staying home.

Sunset

So, my quilt, Sunset is probably being hung up tomorrow morning (or maybe she was hung today) at the AQS Chattanooga show, where she is entered in the Modern Wall Quilt category. They will release the winners on Wednesday morning online, so I will be checking early to see how she does. This quilt won the Modern category at the Canadian National Juried Show in June.

Whether or not she wins a ribbon at Chattanooga, Sunset will be hanging for all the quilters visiting the show to see. Maybe she will inspire a quilter or two to try modern quilting. Maybe someone will find her a relief from the weight of the sepia tinge to so much of the traditional quilts and their fabrics. If you are at that show, I would love it if you would send me a photo of Sunset as she looks at the show.

I like to explore many kinds of quilting and to learn all I can.  But, no matter how much time I may spend working on traditional quilts or designs, I am now absolutely certain of this: I am a modern quilter. I do know what that means and what it does not include. I have no doubts at all.

Best,

Leanne






44 comments:

  1. Your quilt is beautiful and vibrant and wonderful eye candy! I am an older quilter that loves the Modern quilt movement. So thank you for sharing both of your quilts with us, both wonderful. I am also happy I can now get this pattern which your quilt and the pattern makers example are so different just from color choice!! Good commentary !

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  2. It's a of a shock isn't it, finding out how modern quilting is perceived. I took ages to get over some of the responses at the festival of quilts. I think in general over here the contemporary group in the trad guild is a lot more forward thinking that what gets described over there so we have more colour etc. however they tend to yuck everything at it and make art quilts. The modern ethos passes them by. It's hard to describe a state of mind. Some people want to live in a box and live by the parameters that sets for them.

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  3. Good grief, how small minded! (not you, dearheart!) But, yes, you may be correct. If traditional quilters using traditional means of communication and sharing aren't exposed to Modern Quilting then they will make up their own minds about what it is and perpetuate the simple-coz-they-can't-do-any-better-and-don't-care stereotype.
    I've shown a couple of what I class as modern quilts at my local (not modern) guild and the ladies have been very complimentary. One was full of white space and the other was my recent medallion with all the bright pastels (and the skulls!) These ladies are almost all pensioners and have been very kind and open minded so I just assumed that was the norm! I shall treasure them all the more now!
    Myself, I straddle the two movements, I think. You are most certainly a Modern Quilter!! Some people will never get it (kinda like Turner fans being presented with a Pollock painting) but there's no need to be rude and ill-informed about skills just because it's not your taste. So yes, get out there and spread the word because god knows your work is neither simple nor shoddy! As we say round my way, "Gaun yersel'!!"

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  4. It looks like the Quilt Police are still alive and spreading their secular (close minded) views in the quilting community at large.
    If ever there was a hugely inaccurate description of creating a modern quilt it was the one you noted - 'one should divide up the quilt into random segments and use different quilting motifs for each' - it would seem that that instructor has spent very little time considering some of the fantastic, complicated colourful modern quilt creations.
    I often look at a quilt and think it would be easy to do a version of it, but the more I consider the design, the how to, the colour combinations etc, more often than not I come away with a new appreciation of the creative mastery that was used to create it.
    Yes, some of us can only work with patterns, templates and blocks to create our quilts and others of us want to break away from restrictions, confinements and explore, play and challenge our creative instincts. We must do this as much for our own pleasure than anything else and yes we should share it and let others break free to explore, play and challenge themselves to.

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  5. I have to say that makes me incredibly angry. I understand that not every aspect of quilting is for everyone (for example, I really dislike applique!) but you can at least look at a piece and say that it's not for you, but you can see the amazing time/effort/skill that went into crafting that piece. Why is there no open-mindedness for the modern movement? The colors alone should wow folks! Most of my local, more traditional quilters, go goo-goo over FSQ fabrics b/c they didn't ever realize fabric came in such a variety of colors!

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  6. Oh my Gosh - again a stunning quilt - love the improved look of it and your Sunset is just a dream!

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  7. Hi I read your blog and I am not in the Modern Quilt Guild or movement. I think your quilts are beautiful. I am sorry you had any negative experiences. I wish people would be more careful in expressing opinions and not rules, but it does cut both ways. One of my bee friends went to a Modern Quilt Guild meeting here and was so turned off by the print out sheet of rules they handed her that she never went back.

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  8. I wasn´t finished yet, but I was interrupted. I would love to go to Shows and I think I have to ask you how to do. This is an impudence (hope it is the right word), to say those things .... how poor!!!
    We should all go to those Shows.

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  9. your version of Krista's quilt is stunning! and Sunset is always a joy to look at.
    People, being people, are not generally open to change - it can be a slow process, as everyone is comfortable in their own little niche. But education and exposure are the ways to bring about that change, and you've described exactly what most take place in order for modern quilts to become accepted and not criticized.

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  10. Lovely write-up and interesting analysis of what was going on in that part of the country. I remember visiting a famous quilter's shop when I moved to the East Coast, and being told that we did it all wrong out in California: we didn't rip our fabrics on the straight of grain and worse yet, we used a machine to piece them. It was a bad case of This Is The Way We've Always Done It (and I was always a little torqued when I lived there that I had to lose an inch of fabric every time they ripped it off the bolt). Like you, I always smiled (no use arguing) and then went home and rotary-cut my edges clean. I also used clear bright fabrics and machine pieced (and mostly machine quilted) everything. I did find a few kindred spirits, but change comes slowly.

    The Modern Quilters do need to have their voices out there, but they also have to walk a fine line of not doing what you teacher did, of denigrating other styles; I think of the quilting world as a three-legged stool, with modern, art and traditional styles as the three legs.

    Okay, that said. I love your All The Colours (like it better than the original, but then I'm just a color gal). It's fresh and vibrant and wonderful. And good luck to Sunset!

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  11. Love your version of Krista's quilt as well,,,,,the colours just make me happy. Lots to think about with this post.

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  12. I think you hit it right by saying we need to get out there and be engaged with the quilting community. You are right, by entering shows, taking classes and become a voice in the larger quilting community. I think the art community had some of the same growing pains 15-20 years ago that the modern quilters are going through right now. But it gets better day by day thanks to people like you who help spread the modern quilting love!

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  13. Good luck at the show- wow on the closed-mindedness of some people though!

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  14. Very, very interesting post, Leanne. Your point about the lack of connection with social media and the internet is one that I constantly forget but it's key, I think. We're immersed in Modern Quilting every day on our instagram, facebook and twitter feeds, not to mention the blogs etc. Thanks for the push/reminder to get out there and show our quilts, too. Good luck to Sunset at Chattanooga!

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  15. Thanks for sharing this, Leanne. We are called "the moderns" by the traditional quilters in our area. Some just don't get it but others do and we ate making inroads towards greater understanding by putting ourselves and our quilts out there. The online community is a huge component of the modern quilting movement and technology is not embraced by all. But entering shows and having displays and talks are ways of spreading the news about what makes us tick! And it is a good tick that is just as worthy!

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  16. Very interesting. I machine quilt all my quilts (almost). And a woman at my guild said to me that it's was not worthy if it was not hand quilted. Hand quilting is THE only way to add value to a quilt. Of course, she doesn't know how much practice and creativity you need to FMQ. It's like modern quilts. My style is between traditional and modern. I like to try both. You'll have different difficulties and pleasures in each style. People who limits themselves in only one style because of prejudices and keep criticizes other are a pain.

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  17. First of all, love your version of Krista's quilt, I find it exciting.
    I could feel your discomfort at your class, you have witnessed ignorance and small mindedness, if only everyone would live and let live. I reckon even in the Trad world, before Modern Quilting, there were always such comments, as Ethne says, the Quilt Police are alive and kicking. Shame on them.
    Meanwhile, in my classes I continue to encourage my students to make themselves aware of all styles whilst respecting their different choices and tastes.

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  18. oh my. This kinda reminds me of when machine quilting first began to be done. It seems to take a while for things to be accepted. The key is to find our own happiness and that will ripple its way outward. ;-) Ripple away, Leanne

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  19. Yikes. That is so disappointing about the show and the teacher's obvious feelings about modern quilting. There is definitely a need for the MQG and they are serving us well. I am very lucky that my "traditional" guild is super supportive and many of the longtime members are really excited about the work I do and learning how they can incorporate modern ideas into their quilts as well.

    I love that you've already made your own "Leanne" version of Chess on the Steps!!! It's a gorgeous example of what can be done with a solids charm pack! Thank you so much for sharing it with your readers!

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  20. This is the same thing as the strife between the renaissance and modern painters. The former had great technique and spent years perfecting it. They strived to make paintings look as close to the real thing as possible. This was quite a feat. Not easy to do at all. They even captured transparency in fruit. This technique is hardly mastered by artists to this day. Then came Picasso with his modern paintings and caused mayhem. His paintings looked crude, incomplete and draft like in comparison. It takes a while for new ideas to gain acceptance. That does not mean modern quilters can have poorly constructed quilts. I think as the community matures the quilts are getting much better in both quality and aesthetic. My 0.02c

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  21. this blog has certainly stirred us all up, so interesting reading what everyone has to say, being qulte new to quilting I am not sure where I fit, I do know though that I do not like using lots of white but that does not stop me loving the modern quilts, your sunset one is wonderful

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  22. Love your interpretation of Krista's quilt- beautiful! I had a very similar experience to you at a quilting workshop I went to recently, on this side of the pond. I asked one woman if she was a member of her local modern quilting guild ( there is one where she lives) and was told that she was a member of the Quilters Guild, but she didn't like modern quilting, it was all easy blocks that she had done years ago. Another woman said that she couldn't possibly like modern quilting as someone she knew was going to make a quilt in grey, teal and aqua and that was a hideous combination of colours. So, the quilt police are alive and kicking here too.

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  23. Love your bright and colorful take on Krista's quilt and Sunset - well it is gorgeous! Very interesting post, I am sad to read of the instructors resposnse...so much close mindedness and not even the thought that the modern quilter had a cohesive desgin in mind. It reminds me of architecture - how people react to it, say a victorian home with the traditional picket fence and yard vs. the modern, sleek, glass home jutting out over a cliff on the water. Both are beloved homes to someone but evoke very diffierent feelings/reactions in people. Neither are right or wrong, just different. As I live in a very traditional area, I find blogs and IG a lifeline to creativity. So glad to see your beautiful work out there spreading the word.

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  24. I can tell you right now that when I see your quilt at the AQS Chattanooga show...I will have a huge burst of joy running through me! I have always loved your work and to see it in person will be a huge treat!! This will be my first quilt show I have been to. I'm thinking of it as 'research' in hopes of one day entering one of my quilts. While I'm not much of a traditional quiltier, I certainly can appreciate traditional work and finda bit inspiration from it. It is sad that 'modern' is seen as 'the red headed step child' of the quilting world! It just motivates me more...

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  25. I couldn't agree with you more Leanne! Modern quilters need to put their work out there at shows for people to see. I know in the traditional quilt guild I belong to, the women tend to just not know what to think of the things I make, lol. I always get comments about how I'm just making these "easy" quilts because I want to "quilt them to death". I generally just don't say anything, they just don't get it. Yes, many modern quilts are simple, minimal piecing, but there was a lot of design process behind it (it isn't like we just grab some stray pieces of fabric and sew them together, and that's that). And yes, I have a longarm, and could quilt them to death if I want to, but I design the quilting to go with the quilt, so yes, sometimes it is quilted ALOT, but not always, actually more often, not. I was so shocked to read that you were told such things about modern quilts by an instructor, especially one who is teaching a class about modern quilting. I have to say, that as a longarm instructor, who teaches some modern longarm classes, I hear so many different opinions from students in class. Many students in classes are, like me, in love with modern quilts, but, on the flip side, there are always some in class simply because they quilt for others, and need to figure out what to do with "these modern quilts" they are getting from customers (and that is fine, I am obviously there with the hope of educating them). I also quilt for customers, so I hear a lot of different comments from them as well. Of course some customers are designing their modern quilts, and know what they had in mind as far as the quilting, but then, I have customers who tell me they really aren't that crazy about modern quilts, but they are making them because they are quick, and don't care how I quilt it. So I think you are right, modern quilters just need to keep putting their work out there to help educate others. Sorry, just got to rambling, and am now not sure if I even made any point at all, LOL, your post really got my mind racing all over the place. Oh, and, congratulations on your ribbon at the AQS Chattanooga show!!

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  26. Your quilt is beautiful--but I wonder why--if it's already won a big prize--that you are continuing to enter it in other shows. This seems to be a recurring theme. People win a quilt prize and then re-enter and re-enter and re-enter the same quilt over and over again. Then they say it's a multi-winner.
    In my q-guild the largest in Canada--we have a celebrity quilter who drags her winning quilts to show after show--isn't winning once enough? Give somebody else a chance.

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  27. I'm a bit shocked. And sad. I don't like the very traditional quilts (those beige ones), but I would never denigrate others' works or tastes. Here in France modern quilting is non-existent, and I naively thought that in North America, where it's more common, it was better accepted.

    Btw, I love what you did with All the Colours. It's cheerful.

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  28. When I took Madrona Corners to the place near here that lets you long arm your own quilts, I had several interesting conversations with the owners. They are an older couple in their late 60s, and both do beautiful professional quilting on their long arms for other people, as well as hiring them out for others to use. They're apparently considered the rebels of the long arm world here because they hire the machine out, and what if someone breaks it?! (they actually have 2, but that's another story ;o) ), they're seen as reckless and careless by the 'serious' long armers.

    Then there was my quilt top. The wife looked at it and loved it instantly, but then, looking a bit worried, said, 'I don't think Brian will like it.' I just laughed, and asked why, and she told me he was very traditional in his tastes. He turned up after lunch just after I'd finished my practice session, and we were discussing exactly how the quilting would work. He wasn't entirely convinced, I could tell by his face, but he didn't say anything. Eventually, after a marathon session the following week, I finished it. We spread it all out and surveyed it, and he said, 'Do you know, I love it. I didn't think I would like it, but I really do.' He was as surprised at himself as anything I have to say! Now saying that, they weren't passing judgement on others, but I don't think they had a lot of exposure to modern quilting - we had funny conversations all day as each of us started telling the other about something that was commonly know about in 'our' world, and then discovered the other knew nothing about it, it was very eye opening on both sides!

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  29. I do love your Sunset. So very gorgeous with absolutely perfect detail in the stitching! I am probably considered a 'traditional' quilter but I don't think I'm old school traditional if you know what I mean. I love going to quilt shows to see the new trends, but mostly the quilts that people have obviously put their heart and soul into--whatever style they may be. A good quilt will transcend all boundaries and make people stop and take another look and then yet another. If no one was ever willing to put something 'new' out there for public viewing then the quilt shows would become stale and boring. I do think the word 'modern' has been overused by the marketing segment of our quilting world to push bright, fun, easy to make quilts. Perhaps that is another reason why there is confusion about what 'modern' might mean to a blogger vs. an old school traditional quilter.:)

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  30. Leanne, I am home from my first day at AQS Chattanooga where I found your quilt pinned with a white ribbon. It is a lovely quilt, and I really admire your stitching on this one...it looks almost woven somehow. I was one of many volunteers from the Chattanooga MQG in attendance. Considering the size of the show and the breadth of quilt types on display, I'd say the modern segment was reasonably well represented. Not the way I'd expect at Quilt Con, of course, but I came away with the idea that the AQS is quite willing to support a wide variety of quilters, and from several different continents. I saw fused, pieced, appliqued, modern, traditional, art, ethnic, and a wide diversity of style within those. If the show intends to represent all the quilters out there, they did succeed at that.

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  31. Sorry, having a bit of trouble with my connection tonight. The vendors here in TN have a wide variety of fabrics for sale. I was hoping to see a couple of specific modern lines and some bright solids. Haven't found them yet but didn't have time to see all the booths. Must admit that I didn't see much dark or anything tea-dyed, so wasn't sure if you meant that literally. Anyway, in our own guild we are having a good time continuing to learn about modern quilting

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  32. Really sorry, and I'm sorry for the audrey above me because we are two people, not four...btw I do agree with everything the first audrey (not me) said...anyway, once my daughter uploads her photos I can send one, and I'll be going back Friday so if you would like to email me exactly how much background you want included I can try to take the photo again. I already have one of your quilt with the ribbon, and if you are hoping to see what other quilts are in the same category I might have to send those one by one. A couple of the ones in Modern Wall Quilts looked like art quilts to me, but most of them had widely understood modern elements. Apologies for rambling, but it's been a long fun day.

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  33. Beautiful interpretation of Krista's pattern. And congrats on Sunset's award!

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  34. Honestly, I'm so sorry for that experience for you. I could be classified as a "traditional" quilter, although I think I fall somewhere in my own territory of "I am without country" when it comes to sides. I don't go in for sepia/beige/navy/brown heavy quilts. I like white and bright colors, but that is traditional too. I have a quilt that my great-grandmother made in the 30s that is anything but beige or sepia-toned. But I would never consider modern quilts with negative space to be simple, or simplistic. It's not my thing, but so be it. You do it, and do it well. Keep at it.

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  35. I've been in quilt shops where the owners say the same thing about "them modern quilters." And I've met young modern quilters who call traditional quilting "old people quilting." I really just don't understand the need to speak ill of other quilters, especially in sweeping generalizations. It's just as bad as saying women can't be engineers (my own struggle nearly daily). With the 'outside world' already thinking quilters are crazy old biddies (my coworkers are very nice), why would we alienate each other? And if you're so sure that your way is right, why are you so insecure you have to trash others? But, then what do I know? I'm too young to be a serious quilter (I was told that by a shop owner once. I don't shop there anymore.) :D You're quilt is gorgeous, no matter what camp you park it in. I'm sorry your day was sullied by small minded people. As my grandmother says: They own their bad behavior. I should really embroider that on a cushion someday. :D

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  36. Hmmm... Not quite sure I agree with some of your comments. I consider myself more of a traditional quilter, for one thing, and I use a lot of bright colours, and white. So do many quilters I know and whose blogs I read. We may use patterns, and prefer them over improv piecing (which I have tried and can't say I loved), and admire & use traditional blocks. But that doesn't mean the quilts we make are dull, dreary, muddy, or lacking in creativity. And many quilters whose tastes lean more to traditional have blogs & Instagram accounts! Those aren't exclusively used by "modern" quilters.

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  37. What an interesting batch of comments on the modern topic. I'm with Elizabeth on the three legged stool concept. Traditional, art and now modern quilts. I see some modern quilt that look like art quilts and some traditional quilts that look modern etc. In all honesty, I've grown weary of the labels. I have always designed my own quilts and for a long time they always seemed out of touch with the colors most others were using even when the fabrics were more traditional in nature. For years I've also had sketches of minimal abstract concepts and now thanks to modern quilting I am pulling out those sketches and turning them into real quilts. And yet there is still a subtle difference to some of my work that doesn't quite meet the modern definition either. I've decided I need to make what inspires me and not worry about it. Belonging to a modern guild helps and yet sometimes I still feel the fit isn't right. This usually happens when people voice restrictions on their idea of modern. I like a quilt based on its design, fabrics and color choices regardless of whether it's art, modern or traditional. I also appreciate the level of work that goes into some quilts and yet have no desire to do it myself. For me the pleasure comes first from designing be it minimal, block based or even more traditional. I just love playing with designs and color and fabric of course. I've rambled enough. If you got this far congrats on your ribbons. Love the color quilt a lot!

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  38. Thank you for your thoughtful post. I attended the GR Quilt Show in 2013 and came away with the same feeling. When I finally saw the display from Modern Quilt Studio I ran up to the booth and almost hugged Bill Kerr. It was so refreshing and exciting to see their modern quilts. I'll always love the traditional quilts, but the modern quilts have a place in my life, too. I agree with Audrey...waay above, "A good quilt will transcend all boundaries and make people stop and take another look and then yet another. If no one was ever willing to put something 'new' out there for public viewing then the quilt shows would become stale and boring." Keep doing what you're doing. It's all great.

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  39. I'm so sad to hear about your experience at Grand Rapids. It simply says to me that we as members of the modern quilt community have much more education to do. We need to challenge those assumptions respectfully, but not remain silent. I appreciate you sharing your experience.

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  40. Leanne, I could not agree with you more if I had written the post myself. I have been told that modern quilters do not want to enter AQS contests because they don't like the judges, and that's why you don't see many at the shows. But I say IT PAYS figuratively as well as literally to show off your work! As a previous blogger, quilter, and founding member of the Chicago Modern Quilt Guild before becoming the editor-in-chief of American Quilter magazine, I know very well the differences you speak of. I, too, attempt to educate by not accepting article submissions that try desperately to be modern by throwing pieces of fabric together and quilting the heck out of it. There is form, a keen eye for design, palette choices, if we're lucky-a message, and complimentary quilting that is apparent in a modern quilt. I think traditionalists are trying to get it; they are ready to color outside of the lines but not completely sure what do yet. So yes, education is a must. At the Des Moines show right now, Angela Walters is teaching--there's a great class! Judi Madsen also teaches--another longarmer who gets it. Take classes with those teachers to expand your knowledge of longarm quilting. I attended a longarm class by a traditional quilter and yes, i heard the same things you did. I also heard this person speak about using quilting to show movement versus texture--a ha! a skill I can incorporate right away! It's a slow road, especially in my position where the magazine has been historically traditional; some people still don't realize you can find a modern quilt in it! Beyond that, I feel that quilting is art. There is purpose behind the choices and an emotional connection to its making that is conveyed to the viewer of the piece. I have cried looking at the beauty of some quilts. To conclude, i am with you! Let's get modern quilts out there and explain the thought processes behind their making! As we do so, remember to elevate quilting as an ART, for that is what it intrinsically is.
    -michele duffy micheleduffy@aqsquilt.com

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    1. please email me your address and I'll send a few mags out for your perusal!

      Delete

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